Cloning A VVV 2.6 Install

Decided to upgrade my long-term VVV setup that I use for daily client consulting work in preparation for a new gig as head of R&D and CTO for a super cool tech startup. As usual I should have left things alone as it was working fine; I only wanted to play with the newer VVV toys. You’d think I’d learn by now.

What I ended up doing was cloning a working baseline VVV install I had created a few weeks ago for the WordPress Plugin Development class I’ve been teaching at The Blockyard this year as part of the CodeBlock initiative.

Turns out this will be super useful for those nights when we have a dozen students all trying to initialize a new VVV install and we don’t have the bandwidth for 12 simultaneous 500MB box image downloads.

Here are the notes for a MacOS install. Windows will be slightly different but the same concepts apply.

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Ubuntu Trusty: PHP 7.2 MIA

Working with Varying Vagrant Vagrants today and having problems spinning up a new box? Don’t blame yourself. It appears that the PHP 7.2 libs… in fact ALL of the PHP libs for Ubuntu Trusty have gone away.

The ppa:ondrej/php repository that is cited everywhere has decided it is not going to serve up any PHP code to your Vagrant boxes today.

Maybe they’ll fix it soon. Maybe not. If anyone has a workaround please comment here.

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nginx Installing WordPress In A Subdirectory

We have recently run into a number of customers using Store Locator Plus® that are having issues with the new REST based geocoding system. It turns out that an overwhelming percentage of people that are having issues have WordPress installed in a subdirectory. Apparently not all subdirectory installs are created equal — if it is not done properly things break.

What is a subdirectory install?

A subdirectory install is one in which WordPress is installed in a directory within the document root of a website. Sometimes this is done when WordPress is only managing one part of a website such as the newsfeed or blog. Other users use this install to separate WordPress core code from the add-on and upload code (plugins, themes, uploads) and the site configuration.

For the sake of this explanation we’ll reference the document root as being in the public_html directory and WordPress inside of a /wordpress directory within.

Our example install structure
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WordPress.com Video UX Needs Work

For those that are not aware, Automattic and the entire WordPress “stack” have been moving more-and-more toward an all-inclusive SaaS model. At every turn Automattic’s Jetpack and WordPress users are pushed toward creating a WordPress.com account to manage “all WordPress affairs”. With the recent recommended to use the WordPress.com SaaS as a workaround to a partly (ok, mostly) broken video process in Jetpack, the message is clear — WordPress.com will be the hub for all things WordPress.

WordPress.com SaaS dashboard

The problem is the user experience over at WordPress.com needs some work. In many ways it is cleaner and simpler than the somewhat outdated WordPress admin panel many are used to. It also lacks many of the details that have been honed over the past decade to make daily work in WordPress easier.

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Automattic was not ready for WordPress 5

The problems with uploading Jetpack videos in WordPress 5 is just one example of many as to why I continue to recommend not upgrading to WordPress 5 at this time. It is clear that Matt and the folks at Automattic rushed WordPress 5 to market too quickly. Many seasoned WordPress developers including the folks at Yoast — asked Matt to wait.

The ONLY reason they pushed WordPress 5 out to the public was to show it off at WordCamp US 2018 — the big annual event that runs the first week of December.

I get it — who doesn’t like all the “oooh’s and aaah’s” when up on stage a big event. It is a big adrenaline boost.

But it is a bad business decisions that impacts millions of customers, business partners, and vendors.

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