Cloning A VVV 2.6 Install

Decided to upgrade my long-term VVV setup that I use for daily client consulting work in preparation for a new gig as head of R&D and CTO for a super cool tech startup. As usual I should have left things alone as it was working fine; I only wanted to play with the newer VVV toys. You’d think I’d learn by now.

What I ended up doing was cloning a working baseline VVV install I had created a few weeks ago for the WordPress Plugin Development class I’ve been teaching at The Blockyard this year as part of the CodeBlock initiative.

Turns out this will be super useful for those nights when we have a dozen students all trying to initialize a new VVV install and we don’t have the bandwidth for 12 simultaneous 500MB box image downloads.

Here are the notes for a MacOS install. Windows will be slightly different but the same concepts apply.

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Ubuntu Trusty: PHP 7.2 MIA

Working with Varying Vagrant Vagrants today and having problems spinning up a new box? Don’t blame yourself. It appears that the PHP 7.2 libs… in fact ALL of the PHP libs for Ubuntu Trusty have gone away.

The ppa:ondrej/php repository that is cited everywhere has decided it is not going to serve up any PHP code to your Vagrant boxes today.

Maybe they’ll fix it soon. Maybe not. If anyone has a workaround please comment here.

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Switch from Windows to Linux

Linux is also easier to work with when setting up WordPress development through VVV — especially on older laptops.

www.slashgear.com/reasons-to-abandon-windows-for-linux-06572307/

The Code Block : WordPress Plugin Development Block 0

The very first class at The Code Block at The BlockYard is going to begin the journey with WordPress plugin development. This is a starting point only. Something to get the ball rolling. Anticipate multiple forks as we start down the “Code Block chain”. We most certainly will end up in places we don’t expect as we follow this coding journey were it takes us over the next 6 months.

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High Volume Tuning PHP FPM on nginx

As the My Store Locator Plus® service continues to grow we are finding it more important than ever to fine tune our web server and PHP processes to better serve the larger data and network demands. A recent review of performance showed process timeouts happening during large data imports and side-loading; especially when the read and write endpoints hit the same server node. Here are some things we did to improve performance.

Get off faux sockets

PHP FPM is typically installed with file-based sockets. While this lessens traffic on the network hardware, most modern servers are equipped with fiber-ready network connections. These network ports and the TCP stack that interfaces with them can often handle a higher peak load of I/O requests than the file system can manage via the “pretend” sockets run through the operating system file I/O requests.

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