Why #Songwriters Are Getting Left In the Cold by #ASCAP and #BMI…

This article is wrong in so many levels. Where do I start?

First it pits the PROs against The Labels. They are not adversaries. They are two parties that represent the same side of the coin – the rights and royalties due Creatives (Creatives is my way of describing ALL parties involved in creating music: recording artists + songwriters + composers + backup artists + ).

The owner of the master recordings , often referred to as The Labels which is itself an outdated nomenclature, can and should be getting paid fairly as should the copyright holders for the musical composition – often simplified as the PROs. Labels AND PROs both need to be compensated fairly.

The premise of this article is fatally flawed. It assumes the streaming companies like Spotify are already paying fair rates for the product they sell – digital music. In nearly every case this is false. Most streaming companies are not paying anywhere near fair market rates for music. Millions of plays generate pathetically little compensation to the Creatives. Half a billion dollars sounds like a lot to pay but they leave out the fact that this equates to a dollar paid for tens of thousands of songs they sold their listeners.

The article says there is only 100% of the pie to give away. The streaming service needs their piece, and the labels should fight the PROs for what remains. Sounds great in theory until someone points out the pie is 3x too small to feed everyone at the table.

Fixed price all you want to hear streaming services are a flawed business model as is the back room negotiations that are setting the streaming rates with NO involvement from Creatives. The right solution is based on pay for what you consume streaming services and a true fair market system for both buying and selling creative works.


Why #Songwriters Are Getting Left In the Cold by #ASCAP and #BMI…

http://www.digitalmusicnews.com/2016/08/24/songwriters-left-cold-ascap-bmi/

Pandora Looks for a Way Out of the Doldrums. Cue Questlove. – NYTimes.com

It is nice to see streaming companies getting artists involved, but how about paying them fair compensation?

You cannot have a $10/month “all you can eat” song buffet. For most listeners you are not paying fair royalties. Forget Sound Exchange and their $35 per 10,000 songs played; these rates push the PRO compensations levels way below 1/3 of that.

Fixed fee monthly streaming services is a failed business model.

Pandora Looks for a Way Out of the Doldrums. Cue Questlove. – NYTimes.com

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/08/25/business/media/pandora-looks-for-a-way-out-of-the-doldrums-cue-questlove.html?ref=media&_r=1&referer

Pandora Looks for a Way Out of the Doldrums. Cue Questlove. – NYTimes.com

http://mobile.nytimes.com/2016/08/25/business/media/pandora-looks-for-a-way-out-of-the-doldrums-cue-questlove.html?ref=media&_r=1&referer

Unpaid Music Artists – Maybe It’s Time To Blame The Streaming Companies

Songwriters, publishers, performers, and a myriad of others that create the music that defines moments in our lives, serves as the background for dinner dates, house parties, and corporate conventions are earning less money than ever before.   While there are many factors to consider one of the most notable issues is the lack of compensation from streaming services.   Sure, radio has been notorious for their lobbying group that has kept them exempt from paying their fair share of royalties to recording artists, but streaming media has taken it to a whole new level.
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Building A Streaming Music Service : Technology Components

Media File

A media file is the digital file format of the recording of a song.  The most common format today is MP3 which comes is various “flavors” that determine the quality of the audio.   MP3 is considered a “lossy” format which means it uses compression algorithms that can trim off pieces of the music data that it thinks the users will not hear.  FLAC is another common format that is considered lossless.  It uses compression algorithms that restore ALL of the original digital data as it was received.

The quality of any media file recording will depend on the original sound recording, the master recording, and how it was turned into a “digital master”.   Many variables impact the quality of the work including the type of equipment used in the studio and the quality of the digital signal processors (analog-to-digital / digital-to-analog converters).

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Billboard: ESPN Asked to Pay More Than $15 Million Annually to License Ambient Stadium Music

I wonder how, exactly, BMI determines what was played so they can fairly compensate the right creatives behind that music.

The answer is: they have no clue. They will apply their archaic generalized formula and make a wild guess then pay the most popular songwriters and composers. They’ll keep 12% for themselves and a good chunk in reserve , in a bank account where the keep the interest, in case they guessed wrong.

The PROs are a sham. Sad that music creatives don’t demand better.

ESPN Asked to Pay More Than $15 Million Annually to License Ambient Stadium Music
Billboard

In response to ESPN’s demand that a New York federal court determine a reasonable license fee for the performance of songs on its cable sports networks, licensing agency BMI is noting the “vast amounts of music played loudly and prominently in stadiums and arenas,” ambient noise that is often picked up by the broadcaster’s microphones and heard by its viewers. Read the full story

Shared from Apple News

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